INSTRUMENT RATING

GET YOUR HEAD IN THE CLOUDS

The ability to control your aircraft via instruments only (without visual references) can be a life-saving skill for a pilot. Once you’ve obtained your private pilot certificate, the next step would be to receive additional training by getting an instrument rating. As an instrument-rated pilot, you open up another avenue for flying that isn’t available to many pilots. You gain the ability to fly your aircraft in non-VMC (Visual Meteorological Conditions), meaning you can now fly when visibility is reduced beyond conditions that are legal for a private pilot. But most importantly, you acquire skills that will bring an exponentially greater level of safety to your flights. Knowing how to rely on instruments when you have no visual references can be a matter of life or death, which is why we recommend an instrument rating even if you’re only a hobby aviator.

“There is no such thing as bad weather, only different kinds of good weather.”
— John Ruskin

INSTRUMENT PILOT PREREQUISITES:

 

  • Be a U.S. citizen or comply with TSA requirements

  • Must have an FAA 3rd class medical

  • Pass FAA Instrument Pilot written exam

  • Hold a Private Pilot license

  • 50 hours of cross country pilot-in-command time

  • 40 hours of actual or simulated instrument time

  • 15 hours of instruction with a CFII

INSTRUMENT PILOT FIRST STEPS:

 

  • Meet with an instructor and discuss goals
  • Select a ground school or self-study course (after talking with your instructor)
  • Schedule your first lesson
  • Acquire the necessary supplies
  • Understand your budget and schedule constraints

INSTRUMENT PILOT TRAINING EXPERIENCE:

 

  • Sharpen aeronautical decision-making skills
  • Acquire advanced weather knowledge
  • Deepen aircraft systems knowledge
  • Flight without external visual reference, solely by reference to onboard flight instruments
  • Instrument approach and departure procedures
  • IFR flight plans and routing
  • IFR clearances
  • Learn how to exist in, interact with, and adjust to the National Airspace System under IFR

INSTRUMENT PILOT PRIVILEGES:

 

  • Operate in Class A airspace
  • Rent our single-engine airplanes in non-VMC conditions
  • Fly in instrument conditions with decreased ceilings and visibility

WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR?
LET’S FLY!